Tag Archives: Tanzu

VMUG Recording – Protecting your Tanzu Kubernetes Workload with Kasten by Veeam

Below is the recording from my London VMUG session with Michael Cade.

  • Title: Protecting your Tanzu Kubernetes Workload with Kasten by Veeam
  • Recorded: 4th February 2021
  • Abstract:
    • This technical demo led session will take you through how to deploy Kasten in your Tanzu Kubernetes environment to protect your container workloads.

Supporting blog posts;

Regards

 

Installing and configuring Kasten to protect container workloads on VMware Tanzu Kubernetes Grid

This blog post will take you through the full steps on installing and configuring Kasten, the container based enterprise backup software now owned by Veeam Software

This deployment will be for VMware Tanzu Kubernetes Grid which is running on top of VMware vSphere.

You can read how to create backup policies and restore your data in this blog post.

For the data protection demo, I’ll be using my trusty Pac-Man application that has data persistence using MongoDB.

Installing Kasten on Tanzu Kubernetes Grid

In this guide, I am going to use Helm, you can learn how to install it here.

Add the Kasten Helm charts repo.

helm repo add kasten https://charts.kasten.io/

Create a Kubernetes namespace called “kasten-io”

kubectl create namespace kasten-io

kubectl create namespace kasten-io

Next we are going to use Helm to install the Kasten software into our Tanzu Kubernetes Grid cluster.

helm install k10 kasten/k10 --namespace=kasten-io \
--set externalGateway.create=true \
--set auth.tokenAuth.enabled=true \
--set global.persistence.storageClass=<storage-class-name>

Breaking down the command arguments;

  • –set externalGateway.crete=true
    • This creates an external service to use ServiceType=LoadBalancer to allow external access to the Kasten K10 Dashboard outside of your cluster.
  • –set auth.tokenAuth.enabled=true
  • –set global.persistence.storageClass=<storage-class-name>
    • This sets the storage class to be used for the PV/PVCs to be created for the Kasten install. (In a TKG guest cluster there may not be a default storage class.)

You will be presented an output similar to the below.

NAME: k10
LAST DEPLOYED: Fri Feb 26 01:17:55 2021
NAMESPACE: kasten-io
STATUS: deployed
REVISION: 1
TEST SUITE: None
NOTES:
Thank you for installing Kasten’s K10 Data Management Platform!

Documentation can be found at https://docs.kasten.io/.

How to access the K10 Dashboard:

The K10 dashboard is not exposed externally. To establish a connection to it use the following

`kubectl --namespace kasten-io port-forward service/gateway 8080:8000`

The Kasten dashboard will be available at: `http://127.0.0.1:8080/k10/#/`


The K10 Dashboard is accessible via a LoadBalancer. Find the service's EXTERNAL IP using:
`kubectl get svc gateway-ext --namespace kasten-io -o wide`
And use it in following URL
`http://SERVICE_EXTERNAL_IP/k10/#/`

It will take a few minutes for your pods to be running, you can review with the following command;

kubectl get pods -n kasten-io

 kubectl get pods -n kasten-io

Next we need to get our LoadBalancer IP address for the External Web Front End, so that we can connect to the Kasten K10 Dashboard.

kubectl get svc -n kasten-io

Continue reading Installing and configuring Kasten to protect container workloads on VMware Tanzu Kubernetes Grid

Enabling Tanzu Mission Control Data Protection on Red Hat OpenShift

Just a quick blog on how to get the Data Protection feature of Tanzu Mission Control on Red Hat OpenShift. By default you will find that once the data protection feature is enabled, the pods for Restic component of Velero error.

  • Enable the Data Protection Feature on your Openshift cluster

  • You will see the UI change to show it’s enabling the feature.

  • You will see the Velero namespace created in your cluster.

However the “Data Protection is being enabled” message in the TMC UI will continue to show without user intervention. If you show the pods for the Velero namespace you will see they error.

This is because OpenShift has a higher security context out of the box for containers than a vanilla Kubernetes environment.

The steps to resolve this are the same for a native install of the Project Velero opensource install to your cluster.

  • First we need to add the velero service account to the privileged SCC.
oc adm policy add-scc-to-user privileged -z velero -n velero

  • Secondly we need to patch the DaemonSet to allow the containers for Restic run in a privileged mode.
oc patch ds/restic \
--namespace velero \
--type json \
-p '[{"op":"add","path":"/spec/template/spec/containers/0/securityContext","value": { "privileged": true}}]'

After this, if we run the command to get all pods under the Velero namespace again, we’ll see that they are replaced with the new configuration and running.

Going back to our TMC Console, we’ll see the Data Protection feature is now enabled.

Regards

VMware Tanzu Header

A guide to vSphere with Tanzu Kubernetes – Day 2 Operations for the VI Admin

Intro

This blog post is an accompaniment to the session “vSphere with Tanzu Kubernetes – Day 2 Operations for the VI Admin” created by myself and Simon Conyard, with special thanks to the VMware LiveFire Team for allowing us access to their lab environments to create the technical demo recordings.

You can see the full video with technical demos below (1hr 4 minutes). This blog post acts a supplement to the recording.


This session recording was first shown at the Canada VMUG Usercon.

  • You can watch the VMUG session on-demand here.
  • This session is 44 minutes long (and is a little shorter than the one above).

The basic premise of the presentation was set at around a level-100/150 introduction to the Kubernetes world and marrying that to your knowledge of VMware vSphere as a VI Admin. Giving you an insight into most of the common areas you will need to think about when all of a sudden you are asked to deploy Tanzu Kubernetes and support a team of developers.

Scene Setting

So why are we talking about VMware and Kubernetes? Isn’t VMware the place where I run those legacy things called virtual machines?

Essentially the definition of an application has changed. On the left of the below image, we have the typical Application, we usually talk about the three tier model (Web, App, DB).

However, the landscape is moving towards the right hand side, applications running more like distributed systems. Where the data your need to function is being served, serviced, recorded, and presented not only by virtual machines, but Kubernetes services as well. Kubernetes introduces its own architectures and frameworks, and finally this new buzzword, serverless and functions.

Although you may not be seeing this change happen immediately in your workplace and infrastructure today. It is the direction of the industry.

Did you know, vRealize Automation 8 is built on a modern container-based micro-services architecture.

The defintion of an application has changed

VMware’s Kubernetes offerings

VMware has two core offerings;

  • vSphere Native
  • Multi-Cloud Aligned

Within vSphere there are two types of Kubernetes clusters that run natively within ESXi.

  • Supervisor Kubernetes cluster control plane for vSphere
  • Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster, sometimes also referred to as a “Guest Cluster.”

Supervisor Kubernetes Cluster

This is a special Kubernetes cluster that uses ESXi as its worker nodes instead of Linux.

This is achieved by integrating the Kubernetes worker agents, Spherelets, directly into the ESXi hypervisor. This cluster uses vSphere Pod Service to run container workloads natively on the vSphere host, taking advantage of the security, availability, and performance of the ESXi hypervisor.

The supervisor cluster is not a conformant Kubernetes cluster, by design, using Kubernetes to enhance vSphere. This ultimately provides you the ability to run pods directly on the ESXi host alongside virtual machines, and as the management of Tanzu Kubernetes Clusters.

Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster

To deliver Kubernetes clusters to your developers, that are standards aligned and fully conformant with upstream Kubernetes, you can use Tanzu Kubernetes Clusters (also referred to as “Guest” clusters.)

A Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster is a Kubernetes cluster that runs inside virtual machines on the Supervisor layer and not on vSphere Pods.

As a fully upstream-compliant Kubernetes it is guaranteed to work with all your Kubernetes applications and tools. Tanzu Kubernetes Clusters in vSphere use the open source Cluster API project for lifecycle management, which in turn uses the VM Operator to manage the VMs that make up the cluster.

Supervisor Cluster or Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster, which one should I choose to run my application?

Supervisor Cluster:

Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster:

  • Kubernetes clusters that are fully conformant with upstream Kubernetes
  • Flexible cluster lifecycle management independent of vSphere, including upgrades
  • Ability to add or customize open source & ecosystem tools like Helm Charts
  • Broad support for open-source networking technologies such as Antrea

For further information check out the Whitepaper – VMware vSphere with Kubernetes 101

vSphere Native Deployment Options

The above information covers running Kubernetes on your vSphere platform natively. You can deploy as follows;

VMware Cloud Foundation is an integrated full stack solution, delivering customers a validated architecture bringing together vSphere, NSX for software defined networking, vSAN for software defined storage, and the vRealize Suite for Cloud Management automation and operation capabilities.

Deploying the vSphere Tanzu Kubernetes solution is as simple as a few clicks in a deployment wizard, providing you a fully integrated Kubernetes deployment into the VMware solutions.

Don’t have VCF? Then you can still enable Kubernetes yourself in your vSphere environment using vSphere 7.0 U1 and beyond. There will be extra steps for you to do this, and some of the integrations to the VMware software stack will not be automatic.

The below graphic summarises the deployment steps between both options discussed.

Multi-cloud Deployment Options

Building on top of the explanation of Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster explained earlier, Tanzu Kubernetes Grid (TKG) is the same easy-to-upgrade, conformant Kubernetes, with pre-integrated and validated components. This multi-cloud Kubernetes offering that you can run both on-premises in vSphere and in the public cloud on Amazon and Microsoft Azure, fully supported by VMware.

  • Tanzu Kubernetes Grid (TKG) is the name used for the deployment option which is multi-cloud focused.
  • Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster (TKC) is the name used for a Tanzu Kubernetes deployment deployed and managed by vSphere Namespace.

Introducing vSphere Namespaces

When enabling Kubernetes within a vSphere environment a supervisor cluster is created within the VMware Data Center.  This supervisor cluster is responsible for managing all Kubernetes objects within the VMware Data Center, including vSphere Namespaces.  The supervisor cluster communicating with ESXi forms the Kubernetes control plane, for enabled clusters.

A vSphere Namespace is a logical object that is created on the vSphere Kubernetes supervisor cluster.  This object tracks and provides a mechanism to edit the assignment of resources (Compute, Memory, Storage & Network) and access control to Kubernetes resources, such as containers or virtual machines.

You can provide the URL of the Kubernetes control plane to developers as required, where they can then deploy containers to the vSphere Namespaces for which they have permissions.

Resources and permissions are defined on a vSphere Namespace for both Kubernetes containers, consuming resources directly via vSphere, or Virtual Machines configured and provisioned to operate Tanzu Kubernetes Grid (TKG).

Access control

For a Virtual Administrator the way access can be assigned to various Tanzu elements within the Virtual Infrastructure is very similar to any other logical object.

  • Create Roles
  • Assign Permissions to the Role
  • Allocate the Role to Groups or Individuals
  • Link the Group or Individual to inventory objects

With Tanzu those inventory objects include Namespaces’ and Resources.

What I also wanted to highlight was if a Virtual Administrator gave administrative permissions to a Kubernetes cluster, then this has similarities to granting ‘root’ or ‘administrator’ access to a virtual machine.  An individual with these permissions could create and grant permissions themselves, outside of the virtual infrastructure.

Documentation

Continue reading A guide to vSphere with Tanzu Kubernetes – Day 2 Operations for the VI Admin

VMware Tanzu Mission Control – Getting started with your first cluster

In this blog post we will cover the following topics

- What is Tanzu Mission Control?
- So, this isn't just for VMware environments?
- Getting Started Tanzu Mission Control
- - TMC Resource Hierarchy
- - Creating a Cluster Group
- - Attaching a cluster to Tanzu Mission Control
- - Viewing your Cluster Objects
- - - Overview
- - - Nodes
- - - Namespaces
- - - Workloads
- Where can I demo/test/trial this myself?

The follow up blog posts are;

- Tanzu Mission Control 
- - Cluster Inspections
- - - What Inspections are available 
- - - Performing Inspections 
- - - Viewing Inspections
- - Workspaces and Policies
- - - Creating a workspace 
- - - Creating a managed Namespace 
- - - Policy Driven Cluster Management 
- - - Creating Policies
- - Data Protection
- - - Data Protection Overview 
- - - Create a AWS Data Protection Credential 
- - - Enable Data Protection on a Cluster 
- - - Running a backup manually or via an automatic schedule 
- - - Restoring your data

What is Tanzu Mission Control?

Tanzu Mission control is a cloud offering, which gives you a single point of control, monitoring and management, regardless of the Kubernetes deployment and their location (e.g Tanzu Kubernetes Grid, OpenShift Container Platform, Azure Kubernetes to name but a few).

Key Capabilities;

  • Manage Kubernetes Cluster Lifecycle through the deployment and day 2 operations
  • Attach Clusters for centralized operations and management
  • Centralized policy management
    • Apply access, network and container registry policies consistently across your Kubernetes clusters and namespaces
  • Global visibility for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues with your Kubernetes clusters
  • Inspection runbooks to validate the configuration of your clusters
    • Current offerings are;
      • Conformance; validating binaries running in your cluster to ensure proper configuration and running.
      • CIS benchmark; evaluation against the CIS Benchmark for Kubernetes published by the Center for Internet Security.
      • Lite; node conformance test to validate your nodes meet the Kubernetes requirements.

So, this isn’t just for VMware environments?

Nope, this is a cloud and Kubernetes neutral offering. You can attach CNCF conformant Kubernetes clusters to Tanzu Mission Control no matter where they are running: on vSphere, in any public clouds, or through other Kubernetes vendors.

Getting Started Tanzu Mission Control

TMC Resource Hierarchy

In the Tanzu Mission Control resource hierarchy, there are three levels at which you can specify policies.

  • Organization
  • Object groups (Cluster groups and Workspaces)
  • Kubernetes objects (Clusters and Namespaces)

You can set direct policies for a given object, but each object can also inherit based on the parent objects. So pretty much what you’ve been used to in the past with policies and hierarchies.

Creating a Cluster Group

A Cluster Group is a logical object to bring together multiple Kubernetes clusters. You can set user access policies to be able to view/edit/control cluster group objects and their child objects (clusters).

Cluster groups provide an infrastructure view, and all clusters must be attached to a group.

To create a Cluster Group;

  • Select the Cluster Group from the navigation
  • Click New Cluster Group
  • Supply a name, description and labels are optional and can be edited after creation

Continue reading VMware Tanzu Mission Control – Getting started with your first cluster