Tag Archives: vSphere

OpenShift

How to Install and configure vSphere CSI Driver on OpenShift 4.x

Introduction

In this post I am going to install the vSphere CSI Driver version 2.0 with OpenShift 4.x, in my demo environment I’m connecting to a VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC and vCenter, however the steps are the same for an on-prem deployment.

I have updated the available configuration files available from Red Hat for installing the CSI Driver in OpenShift, to make them compatible with the latest CSI Driver. You can find these in my GitHub repo;

- Pre-Reqs
- - vCenter Server Role
- - Download the deployment files
- - Create the vSphere CSI secret in OpenShift
- - Create Roles, ServiceAccount and ClusterRoleBinding for vSphere CSI Driver
- Installation
- - Install vSphere CSI driver
- - Verify Deployment
- Create a persistent volume claim
- Using Labels
- Troubleshooting

In your environment, cluster VMs will need “disk.enableUUID” and VM hardware version 15 or higher.

Pre-Reqs
vCenter Server Role

In my environment I will use the default administrator account, however in production environments I recommend you follow a strict RBAC procedure and configure the necessary roles and use a dedicated account for the CSI driver to connect to your vCenter.

To make life easier I have created a PowerCLI script to create the necessary roles in vCenter based on the vSphere CSI documentation;

Download the deployment files

Run the following;

git clone https://github.com/saintdle/vSphere-CSI-Driver-2.0-OpenShift-4.git

Create the vSphere CSI Secret in OpenShift

Edit the file “csi-vsphere-for-OCP.conf” with your vCenter infrastructure details;

[Global]
 
# run the following on your OCP cluster to get the ID
# oc get clusterversion -o jsonpath='{.items[].spec.clusterID}{"\n"}'
cluster-id = "OCP_CLUSTER_ID"

[VirtualCenter "VC_FQDN"]
insecure-flag = "true"
user = "USER"
password = "PASSWORD"
port = "443"
datacenters = "VC_DATACENTER"

Create the secret;

oc create secret generic vsphere-config-secret --from-file=csi-vsphere-for-OCP.conf --namespace=kube-system

oc get secret vsphere-config-secret --namespace=kube-system

This configuration is for block volumes, it is also supported to configure access to VSAN File volumes, and you can see an example of the configuration here;

Remove your “csi-vsphere-for-OCP.conf” once the secret is created, as it contains your password in clear text for vCenter.

Create Roles, ServiceAccount and ClusterRoleBinding for vSphere CSI Driver

Continue reading How to Install and configure vSphere CSI Driver on OpenShift 4.x

OpenShift

How to deploy OpenShift 4.3 on VMware vSphere with Static IP addresses using Terraform

Install OpenShift 4.x on vSphere 6.x/7.x

The following procedure is intended to create VM’s from an OVA template booting with static IP’s when the DHCP server can not reserve the IP addresses.

The Problem

OCP requires that all DNS configurations be in place. VMware requires that the DHCP assign the correct IPs to the VM. Since many real installations require the coordination with different teams in an organization, many times we don’t have control of DNS, DHCP or Load balancer configurations.

The CoreOS documentation explain how to create configurations using ignition files. I created a python script to put the network configuration using the ignition files created by the openshift-install program.

Reference Architecture

For this guide, we are going to deploy 3 master nodes (control-plane) and 2 worker nodes (compute This guide uses RHEL CoreOS 4.3 as the virtual machine image, deploying Red Hat OCP 4.3, as per the support of N-1 from Red Hat.

We will use a centralised Linux server (Ubuntu) that will perform the following functions;

  • Load Balancer – HAProxy
  • Web Server – Apache2
  • Terraform automation host – version 0.11.14
    • The deployment will be semi-automated using Terraform, so that we can easily build configuration files used by the CoreOS VM’s that have Static IP settings.
    • Using a later version of Terraform will cause failures.
  • Client Tools for OpenShift deployment
    • OC
    • Kubectl
    • Openshift-install

DNS will be provided by a Windows Server.

The installation will use a Bootstrap server to bring the cluster online, which will be removed at the end of the build process.

Deployment Steps

In this guide we will deploy our environment in the following order;

  • Configure DNS
  • Import Red Hat Core OS image into vCenter
  • Deploy Ubuntu Host
    • Configure Apache
    • Configure HAProxy
    • Install Client-Tools
    • Install Terraform
  • Build OpenShift Cluster configuration
  • Configuring the Terraform deployment
  • Running the Terraform deployment
DNS

Openshift uses a “clusterName.BaseDomain” format.

For example; I want to call my Openshift cluster Demo. And my DNS Domain is Simon.local, then my full format used by Openshift is “demo.simon.local”

Below is a table plan of the IP addresses you will use to build the environment.

The last three addresses are cluster level resources that are available on each control-plane node, accessible via the load balancer.

To configure the DNS records in Windows, you can use the Script and CSV file here

In the below screenshot, the script has created the “demo” domain folder and entered my records. It is important that you have PTR records setup for everything apart from the “etcd-X” records.

Import Red Hat CoreOS Image into vCenter

Continue reading How to deploy OpenShift 4.3 on VMware vSphere with Static IP addresses using Terraform

vBrownbag Session – Upgrading from vSphere 5.5 to 6.x

VMworld 2018, I was lucky enough to get my name down on the list to present on the vBrownbag stage, a community driven source of brilliant knowledge articles, videos, and web meetings, for the community by the community. Read more about vBrownbag here

In the below session I took on the session that had proved to be a hit at VMUGs around the UK. “Upgrading from vSphere 5.5 to 6.x”

This session focuses less on the “how to upgrade the components themselves” but more what you need to cover for planning and preparation, considerations during the upgrades, and calling out known gotchas.

Since the above video, I’ve since joined VMware, and presented the official slide deck covering this subject at the UK VMUG Usercon with Kev Johnson, Technical Marketing Engineer – vSphere Lifecycle.

You can find the official free e-book that accompanies the VMware presentations here;

Regards

Dean