Tag Archives: vSphere

vSphere and CSI Header

Upgrading the vSphere CSI Driver (Storage Container Plugin) from v2.1.0 to latest

In this post I’m just documenting the steps on how to upgrade the vSphere CSI Driver, especially if you must make a jump in versioning to the latest version.

Upgrade from pre-v2.3.0 CSI Driver version to v2.3.0

You need to figure out what version of the vSphere CSI Driver you are running.

For me it was easy as I could look up the Tanzu Kubernetes Grid release notes. Please refer to your deployment manifests in your cluster. If you are still unsure, contact VMware Support for assistance.

Then you need to find your manifests for your associated version. You can do this by viewing the releases by tag. 

Then remove the resources created by the associated manifests. Below are the commands to remove the version 2.1.0 installation of the CSI.

kubectl delete -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes-sigs/vsphere-csi-driver/v2.1.0/manifests/latest/vsphere-7.0u1/vanilla/deploy/vsphere-csi-controller-deployment.yaml

kubectl delete -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes-sigs/vsphere-csi-driver/v2.1.0/manifests/latest/vsphere-7.0u1/vanilla/deploy/vsphere-csi-node-ds.yaml

kubectl delete -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes-sigs/vsphere-csi-driver/v2.1.0/manifests/latest/vsphere-7.0u1/vanilla/rbac/vsphere-csi-controller-rbac.yaml

vsphere-csi - delete manifests

Now we need to create the new namespace, “vmware-system-csi”, where all new and future vSphere CSI Driver components will run. Continue reading Upgrading the vSphere CSI Driver (Storage Container Plugin) from v2.1.0 to latest

Terraform Header

Terraform vSphere Provider – Error while creating vApp properties

The Issue

When using Terraform to deploy a virtual machine OVA using Terraform, I kept hitting the below error:

Error: error while creating vapp properties config unsupported vApp properties in vapp.properties: [vm.vmname vami.gateway.DMS_agent_VA vami.netmask0.DMS_Agent_VA vami.DNS.DMS_Agent_VA vami.searchpath.DMS_Agent_VA vami.ip0.DMS_Agent_VA vami.domain.DMS_Agent_VA]

  on Agent_appliance/main.tf line 20, in resource "vsphere_virtual_machine" "vm":
  20: resource "vsphere_virtual_machine" "vm"

Pretty simple right? In my Terraform file I was trying to use OVF Properties that were not valid. Getting the debug/trace logs from terraform also just showed the same error output.

However running ovftool, confirmed my properties were correct. (shortened output example).

ClassId:     vami
  Key:         searchpath
  InstanceId   DMS_Agent_VA
  Category:    Networking Properties
  Label:       Domain Search Path
  Type:        string
  Description: The domain search path (comma or space separated domain names) 
               for this VM. Leave blank if DHCP is desired.

But also in the vCenter UI, looking at the vApp Properties of a the OVA once deployed, again I could validate the the properties I was using were correct.

vCenter - Virtual Machine vApp Options Properties

Finally an example of the vSphere_virtual_machine resource I was trying to deploy that was causing me issues:

resource "vsphere_virtual_machine" "vm" {
  name             = "${var.agent_vm_name}"
  resource_pool_id = "${var.resource_pool_id}"
  datastore_id     = "${data.vsphere_datastore.datastore.id}"
  folder           = "${var.folder}"
  wait_for_guest_net_timeout = 0
  wait_for_guest_ip_timeout  = 0
  datacenter_id    = "${data.vsphere_datacenter.dc.id}"
  host_system_id = "${data.vsphere_host.host.id}"

  dynamic "ovf_deploy" {
  for_each = "${var.agent_local_ovf_path}" != "" || "${var.agent_remote_ovf_path}" != "" ? [0] : []
  content {
  // Path to local or remote ovf/ova file
  local_ovf_path = "${var.agent_local_ovf_path}" != "" ? "${var.agent_local_ovf_path}" : null
  remote_ovf_url = "${var.agent_remote_ovf_path}" != "" ? "${var.agent_remote_ovf_path}" : null
   disk_provisioning    = "thin"
   ovf_network_map = {
        "Control Plane Network" = data.vsphere_network.network.id
    }
   }
  }

  vapp {
    properties = {
      "vm.vmname" =  "${var.agent_vm_name}",
      "varoot_password" = "${var.varoot_password}",
      "vaadmin_password" = "${var.va_admin_password}",
      "guestinfo.cis.appliance.net.ntp" = "${var.ntp}",
      "vami.gateway.DMS_agent_VA" = "${var.controlplanenetworkgateway}",
      "vami.DNS.DMS_Agent_VA" = "${var.dns}",
      "vami.domain.DMS_Agent_VA" = "${var.domain}",
      "vami.searchpath.DMS_Agent_VA" = "${var.searchpath}",
      "vami.ip0.DMS_Agent_VA" = "${var.agentip0}",
      "vami.netmask0.DMS_Agent_VA" = "${var.agentip0netmask}"
    }
  }
}
The Cause

Yep, you guessed it, there was something wrong with the properties I was trying to configure.

The Fix

Continue reading Terraform vSphere Provider – Error while creating vApp properties

VMware Tanzu Header

vSphere with Tanzu – cidrBlocks intersects with the network range of the external ip pools

The Issue

When deploying a vSphere with Tanzu guest cluster via the command line, I hit the following error:

kubectl apply -f cluster.yaml

Error from server (spec.settings.network.pods.cidrBlocks intersects with the network range of the external ip pools in network provider's configuration, spec.settings.network.pods.cidrBlocks intersects with the network range of the external ip pools LB in network provider's configuration): 

error when creating "cluster.yaml": admission webhook "default.validating.tanzukubernetescluster.run.tanzu.vmware.com" denied the request: spec.settings.network.pods.cidrBlocks intersects with the network range of the external ip pools in network provider's configuration, spec.settings.network.pods.cidrBlocks intersects with the network range of the external ip pools LB in network provider's configuration

The Cause

The default CIDR Block used by vSphere with Tanzu for the Pod Networking is 192.168.0.0/16 . Therefore if you have any over laps with this in your Workload Management setup, such as, in my case the Load Balancing configuration when integrating with NSX-T. You will end up with a failure.

Cluster - Namespace - Network - workload configuration

This will happen if you use a deployment YAML for your cluster such as the below, there is no pod networking settings specified, so the default is chosen.

apiVersion: run.tanzu.vmware.com/v1alpha1
kind: TanzuKubernetesCluster
metadata:
  name: veducate-cluster
  namespace: deanl
spec:
  distribution:
    version: v1.18.15
  topology:
    controlPlane:
      class: best-effort-small
      count: 1
      storageClass: management-storage-policy-thin
    workers:
      class: best-effort-small
      count: 3
      storageClass: management-storage-policy-thin
  settings:
    network:
      cni:
        name: calico
    storage:
      defaultClass: management-storage-policy-thin
The Fix

Continue reading vSphere with Tanzu – cidrBlocks intersects with the network range of the external ip pools

OpenShift

How to specify your vSphere virtual machine resources when deploying Red Hat OpenShift

When deploying Red Hat OpenShift to VMware vSphere platform, there are two methods:

  • User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI)
  • Installer Provisioned Infrastructure (IPI)

There are several great blogs covering both options and deployment methods.

In this blog, we are going to use the IPI method but customize the settings of our Virtual Machines that are deployed setting CPU and Memory that is different from the default settings.

Getting Started
Setting up your Jump host Machine

I’ll be using an Ubuntu Machine as my jumphost for the deployment.

Download the OpenShift-Install tool and OC command line tool. (I’ve used version 4.6.4 in my install)

Extract the files and copy to your /usr/bin/local directory

tar -zxvf openshift-client-linux.tar.gz
tar -zxvf openshift-install-linux.tar.gz

Have an available SSH key from your jump box, so that you can connect to your CoreOS VMs one they are deployed for troubleshooting purposes.

You need to download the vCenter trusted root certificates from your instance and import them to your Jump Host.

Curl -O https://{vCenter_FQDN}/certs/download.zip

Then the following to import (ubuntu uses the .crt files, hence importing the win folder);

unzip download.zip
cp certs/win/* /usr/local/share/ca-certificates
update-ca-certificates

You will need an account to connect to vCenter with the correct permissions for the OpenShift-Install to deploy the cluster. If you do not want to use an existing account and permissions, you can use this PowerCLI script to create the roles with the correct privileges based on the Red Hat documentation.

If you are installing into VMware Cloud on AWS, like myself, you will also need to allow connectivity from your segments as follows:

  • Compute gateway
    • OCP Cluster network to the internet
    • OCP Cluster network to your SDDC Management Network
  • Management gateway
    • OCP Cluster network to ESXi – HTTPs traffic

DNS Records – You will need the two following records to be available on your OCP Cluster network in the same IP address space that your nodes will be deployed to.

  • {clusterID}.{domain_name}
    • example: ocp46.veducate.local
  • *.apps.{clusterID}.{domain_name}
    • example: *.apps.ocp46.veducate.local

If your DNS is a Windows server, you can use this script here. Continue reading How to specify your vSphere virtual machine resources when deploying Red Hat OpenShift

OpenShift

Red Hat OpenShift on VMware vSphere – How to Scale and Edit your cluster deployments

Working with Red Hat OpenShift on vSphere, I’m really starting to understand the main infrastructure components and how everything fits together.

Next up was understanding how to control the cluster size after initial deployment. So, with Red Hat OpenShift, there are some basic concepts we need to understand first, before we jump into the technical how-to’s below in this blog.

In this blog I will cover the following;

- Understanding the concepts behind controlling Machines in OpenShift
- Editing your MachineSet to control your Virtual Machine Resources
- Editing your MachineSet to scale your cluster manually
- Deleting a node
- Configuring ClusterAutoscaler to automatically scale your environment

Machine API

The Machine API is a combination of primary resources that are based on the upstream Cluster API project and custom OpenShift Container Platform resources.

The Machine API performs all node host provisioning management actions as a post cluster installation method, providing you dynamic provisioning on top of your VMware vSphere platform (and other public/private cloud platforms).

The two primary resources are:

Machines
An object that describes the host for a Node. A machine has a providerSpec, which describes the types of compute nodes that are offered for different cloud platforms. For example, a machine type for a worker node on Amazon Web Services (AWS) might define a specific machine type and required metadata.
MachineSets
Groups of machines. MachineSets are to machines as ReplicaSets are to Pods. If you need more machines or must scale them down, you change the replicas field on the MachineSet to meet your compute need.

These custom resources add capabilities to your OpenShift cluster:

MachineAutoscaler
This resource automatically scales machines in a cloud. You can set the minimum and maximum scaling boundaries for nodes in a specified MachineSet, and the MachineAutoscaler maintains that range of nodes. The MachineAutoscaler object takes effect after a ClusterAutoscaler object exists. Both ClusterAutoscaler and MachineAutoscaler resources are made available by the ClusterAutoscalerOperator.
ClusterAutoscaler
This resource is based on the upstream ClusterAutoscaler project. In the OpenShift Container Platform implementation, this is integrated with the Machine API by extending the MachineSet API. You can set cluster-wide scaling limits for resources such as cores, nodes, memory, GPU, etc. You can configure priorities so that the cluster prioritizes pods so that new nodes are not brought online for less important pods. You can also set the ScalingPolicy, so that for example, you can scale up nodes but not scale down the node count.

MachineHealthCheck

This resource detects when a machine is unhealthy, deletes it, and, on supported platforms, creates a new machine. You can read more here about this technology preview feature in OCP 4.6.

Editing your MachineSet to control your Virtual Machine Resources

To view the current MachineSet objects available run; Continue reading Red Hat OpenShift on VMware vSphere – How to Scale and Edit your cluster deployments