Category Archives: General

Powershell snippet – text to secure string and output to XML file

Below is a quick Powershell command I use to convert passwords to secure strings and output to an XML file, I can encrypt that XML file locally on the machine where any scripts need to run from, and call it in another Powershell script.

$secpasswd = ConvertTo-SecureString "VMware1!" -AsPlainText -Force

#The logic used here between the brackets is Username,Password, where we call our previous variable

$mycreds = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("administrator", $secpasswd) 

$mycreds | export-clixml -path c:\temp\password.xml

It’s quick and easy to use, there will be other ways that may work better for you, if so, drop them in the comments.

Join VMware & the [email protected] project in the fight against COVID-19

I won’t give a long written speech about the crisis we all face today.

However I do encourage you to spend your spare CPU cycles from your devices, whether thats personal devices or home lab servers, or anything else you can run the software, to fight the virus.

You can do this anonymously, or join a team, The main thing is you join up to help!!!;

  • VMware – 52737
  • EUC Community – 239018

The setup is really simple,

  1. Download the [email protected] software
  2. Install the software
  3. Setup your [email protected] client
  4. Select “Setup an Identity”
  5. Choose your username, and set your team as “52737″ to join VMware.

Naming Conventions and Standards for Systems and Devices

We all know how important it is to have a naming standard for our systems and devices that means something, rather than a number of Greek mythological names that ultimately mean nothing to most.

A quick google of “Server naming conventions” will lead you to actual help, or polls from slashdot on this subject, or even lists of the best and worst naming conventions in vendor blogs whilst they hammer you to buy their warez (<<< That link may have a massive popup from GFI trying to push you something). Or you can always fall back on reddit to get to heart of the action.

 

Here I am sharing the naming conventions we designed and implemented whilst I was working as a consultant. Please feel free to use, adapt or ignore as you please.

Name Convention Examples

For a good clean and clear name we defined the following;

  • Identify the client or site
    • 2 Letter Abbreviation
  • Site/Location Identification
    • 2 Digit Number
  • Primary Role or Function of the Service/Device
    • 3 Letter Abbreviation + 2 Digits for numbered instance
  • Identify the deployment type, such as Production/Test/Development/Staging
    • 1 Letter Identifier
  • Identify the service characteristic type such as Physical/Virtual Machine/Container
    • 1 Letter Identifier

Below I’ve drawn out a breakdown of such as a table;

Sorry for inserting the tables as images, but its the one lacking function of wordpress!

Or if its easier, here is a nice colourful diagram; Continue reading Naming Conventions and Standards for Systems and Devices

Interview – Matthew Steiner – Cloud Technologist and Author

Matthew is currently working at VMware as a cloud management technologist, spending the majority of his time visiting customers and discussing their cloud journey. 2020 will mark a milestone, with it being his tenth year at VMware.

Since personally joining VMware in 2018, I’ve had the pleasure of working with Matthew on a common customer, which has led us to sharing a number of trips together. During this time, I’ve learnt a lot from Matt and his insights about the industry, also from Matt as a person. This interview post is brought to you from a number of those chats.

You can find Matt online at the below locations, and no doubt presenting at a VMware or VMUG event near you!

Was technology your first calling?

I’ve always been around tech from the very beginning whilst in school, joining the computer club so I could use the Sinclair ZX81 Spectrum. Like most computer clubs, spending time writing code, and was lucky enough to have it published in a computer magazine at the time.

After leaving school, a move to a Chemical manufacturer lead to learning Cobol programming for their CRM system, client software, and configuring a lot of modems. Unfortunately, I was made redundant from one role, and this is where I moved into the contracting world, working for a large European bank. From here I stayed on and moved my way up through the various roles from entry level technician keeping the lights on, to leading the teams keeping the lights on.

Can you recall the moment where you found yourself thinking “I can move beyond day-to-day operations, work with customers in a more strategic capacity?”

There was not an immediate moment of this happening, it was all part of the journey of during my career. In the latter days working for the European bank, as I’d moved up the ladder, I spent time thinking and articulating the effects of the technology and its effects on the business, especially the positive effects.

In 2000, I moved away from the technical administration roles and joined Compaq as a pre-sales consultant. This solidified the move away from break-fix and I got to see the other side of “the fence” so to speak. Certainly, joining a sales organisation and being part of that sales focus was a shock to the system.

But this was also the start of working with a range of customers from a more strategic position and taking my experiences of the positive impacts of technology on a business out to a wider audience.

Sales Kick off in New York with Compaq, they still meet up each year, the IT space in Scotland is a small world!
Featuring (L-R); Matthew Steiner, Brett Wells, Brian Duffy and Andy Hughes

How would you summarise/guide a person, start focusing on the business before tech? Continue reading Interview – Matthew Steiner – Cloud Technologist and Author