Monthly Archives: February 2020

Introducing VMware TAM Lab YouTube Channel

The VMware Technical Account Management team have been producing some internal videos for a while now, to show off what we see in the field or tackle common issues, or discuss new technology.

Thanks to my earlier work creating a GUI with PowerShell, I was asked to present this internally.

Since then, we’ve taken TAMLAB public, thanks to the hard work of Steve Tilkens, so give our channel a follow, and you can see my recording below;

The purpose of TAM Lab is to provide in-depth technology workshop sessions led by VMware Technical Account Managers (TAMs) to enable a culture of learning and partnership across the VMware organization and our customers. TAM Lab provides a platform for all to be hands-on with VMware and non-VMware technologies that will enable a stronger customer delivery through product knowledge and a greater technical resource network. All TAM Lab sessions are recorded for the purpose of creating a reference library for on-demand learning and enablement.

 

Regards

Dean

Building a Veeam Lab – Testing Scenarios

In my previous post, I looked at the architecture you may want to implement to test the various features of Veeam Backup and Replication, including features from v10.

I thought it would be a good idea to break down the architecture into sections, and provide some ideas of what features/configurations can be tested in each section. This of course is not an exhaustive list.

I’ve broken down the original diagram into 5 Sections.

Section 1 – VMware Cluster Continue reading Building a Veeam Lab – Testing Scenarios

Building a Veeam Lab – a recommended architecture

This blog posts spawns from an interesting discussion between the Veeam Vanguard members on what components are needed to build an effective lab for testing out most of the Veeam features, especially with v10 around the corner. So, I’ve put together something that should hopefully work for this;

I’m not really going to focus on the platform you’ll be running this on, as you should already have some sort of home lab if you are looking to run a Veeam lab, I’d assume.

  • AD and DNS – I’m just going to presume you have this up and running already.
    • If you are trying to cut down your home lab infrastructure, this blog on running PhotonOS as DNS server and NTP server is helpful
  • vSphere Environment
    • Cluster can be as big as you like or already have as your homelab
    • Standalone host for replica’s, or just target one of your existing hosts directly in the replica configuration
  • Hyper-V standalone host
    • Just for running one or two Virtual machines. But if you are a Hyper-v admin, you probably already have a lab you can use.
  • Backup Repository
    • There a few options you can use, but you need to consider where you store your data, if it is on the vSphere environment itself, you may run out of storage fast. An External NAS would be best.

I have wrote a second blog, which covers the testing scenarios that the below architecture covers.

Veeam Components

Veeam Backup and Replication Server:

This is going to be your main virtual machine, and you can multi-home a few components on here, especially if you are not fussed about the performance.

For the database, you should be OK with the built in SQL Express install.

Sizing minimums:

  • 2 vCPU cores, 8 GB RAM, HDD space 60GB (inclusive of Logs, vPowerNFS, VBR software)
  • Recommendations for sizing;
    1 vCPU core (physical or virtual) and 4 GB RAM per 10 concurrently running jobs.

Continue reading Building a Veeam Lab – a recommended architecture

Veeam VMCE 2020 – Beta course and exam

The last week of January for me, was spent taking some annual leave, and attending a special invite only edition of the Veeam VMCE 2020 course, at their offices in Bucharest.

The 3-day course, or event (as I’ll explain), was hosted by Rasmus Haslund and Bart Pellegrino. Several Veeam Solution Architects, Systems Engineers and Channel enablement were present, and finally 8 of the Veeam Vanguard community, which is how I got my ticket into the room. You can follow those members Below;

The course/event

This was run along the lines of “train the trainer” with a large focus on active feedback about the course content, what the current VMCE trainers in the room see the in classroom, and what we see in the field itself during implementation. So, I’d refer to my 3 days as an event rather than a course. Continue reading Veeam VMCE 2020 – Beta course and exam